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and administrative law and sometimes property, sometimes local government law. >> when you approached the affairs or said the manuscript to a publisher, was the answer back from public affairs and why were they interested in the story? >> well, fortunately i already had a relationship from my first book about the book that's title to the integration why we still study to be in emigrated society. so i had a relationship with them and i sent a proposal to them i think they knew i was a fairly tenacious person, and they also found the story compelling. so thank you, public affairs. >> just a short conversation with george on professor sheryll cashin about her second book, "the agitators' daughter a memoir of four generations of an extraordinary african american family." by the way, booktv covered the professor earlier on this book and it's about one hour in length. you can go to booktv.org and type in her name and you can watch the entire hour. thanks for being with us. >> sarah gordon talks about religious cases in history that have transformed the law of the country and dominated protection in the
of the tribal government and communities. i am also pleased to welcome our distinguished guests in washington d.c. and those listening around the country to the 2013 state of andean nations. across the country, students, teachers, businesses have gathered to watch this event together. among many events we are pleased to be joined by students from the laguna middle-school, boys and girls club have a greater scottsdale tribes like the muscogee creek nation, confederate tribes in the tele, reservation and hosting tribal parties brought this is by many areas of the country have also pleased to be joined by the college of the nomination, the american indian college fund. these are just a small selection of events happening today and they want to thank them and all of you for joining us. we have an incredible turnout here in washington d.c. and i like to acknowledge your guess in the studios of distance-learning. and the administration which showed it a lot in the white house. dr. ruby doe from hs, lillian sparks administration are native americans and also representatives of key federal agencies tha
, the medicare c is the money, the federal government says the money. but there is the different costs associated with the subsidies would extend coverage and the medicaid expansion. so it's not exactly a win-win situation according to the analysis that the kaiser family foundation has conducted. >> i do endorse her briefing that we did in december. a lot of different materials and a webcast that you can watch. we have several related questions and maybe john can take the first crack at it. it has to do with medicare advantage plans. they ask generally how does star rating system works. that is related to a question that was not asked here, but was passed by the senate office, which ask how come a lot of money went to three-star plans this time around. we could relate that to this question. they are related. explain how it is scheduled to take effect. i understand that only about 4% may have taken effect now. do you anticipate that some of the problems that you have referred to and perhaps lesser benefits could show up in this again. >> i will try my best to answer every question. before the affo
that he can go in and impose the strategy that he wants to impose in the united states government this isn't a coincidence. it's been very exquisitely coordinated. >> you can watch this and other programs online at book tv. >> up next on book tv, samuel argues if our elected leaders do not find the courage to reform the economy and government spending soon, the u.s. could find itself in the same terrible economic situation as many european countries do today. this is just over an hour. >> coming to speak at the heritage foundation today it is a great privilege to be here. i've always been a great admirer of heritage and the council in many cases the friendship of many people at heritage for a long time. i admire your the way that heritage works across the policy areas so that you really do here and the integrated message not least among which i think is the attention of the heritage foundation to the power of culture by which i mean the believes, ideas, habits, expectations and the ways that these achieve some form of institutional what the exception this issue of the culture and how it re
conflicts are rooted in the clash already taking place before and 11 was centered government and the triumph of the community on the border between states. without local history or culture it is impossible to impose simplistic notions but someone did waziristan or yemen is aghast at a clash of civilizations and. 90% had no idea what 9/11 was zero or of some of did not been. would have to be careful how we are analyzing and i maintain there is a crisis already was united states involved in a local conflict. >> host: ambassador to bases u.s. attacking their own personal try for their government? >> guest: you raised the third factor, with united states, the tribes now of the central government with a triangle of conflict that is the conflict said is often overlooked. would you include the central government than you know, it has its own relationship for some benefit and it is troubled earth these jurors south africa and asia you find this. if it is tolerant and open to give citizens the right they deserve to freedom or education but if it surprised -- suppresses but you have problems where yo
row is invited to depart. >> on c-span2, a hearing on a government report on federal programs vulnerable to waste, fraud, and abuse and mismanagement. then at 9 a.m., the homeland security department in light of the gao report. >> domestic drone use is the focus of the house science space and technology subcommittee hearing friday morning. members will examine the challenges facing operations in u.s. airspace. officials from the faa and nasa are expected to testify. live coverage 10 a.m. eastern on our companion network c-span3. >> thursday at a senate banking hearing committee on dodd-frank financial regulations senator elizabeth warren of massachusetts, thomas curry, about prosecuting big banks when they break the law. here's a portion of the event. >> thank you very much, mr. chairman. thank you, ranking member. it's good to be here. thank you all for editing. i sat what he said. it's harder than look so i appreciate your being you. i want to ask a question about supervising banks when they break the law. including the mortgage foreclosure of others as well. we all understa
to reform the economy and government spending soon, the u.s. could find itself in the same terrible economic situation as many european countries do today. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> thank you john for your very kind introduction and the invitation to speak at the heritage foundation today. it's a great privilege to be here. i have always been a great admirer of heritage and the council and in many cases the friendship of many people here at heritage for a very long time i have also admired the way that heritage works across policy areas so that you really do here and integrated message. not least among which i think is the intention of the heritage foundation to the power of culture, by which i mean people believe ideas, habits and expectations in the way that these achieve some form of institutional expression. this issue of culture and how it relates to the economy is at the heart of my book, "becoming europe" because at one level becoming europe is certainly about what has happened in europe and why it is now regarded as the sick man of the global economy. my book is also a
/11 between central government and the tribes and communities on their borders, on the areas between states. so, therefore, without an understanding of local culture or history, it's impossible to implosion immiss stick notions. i know we here in the united states sigh this as a class of civilization but talk to one? iran or yemen and they will just look aghast at the concept there's a clash of civilizations. 90% of the survey had no idea what 9/11 was or who osama bin laden was. so, of there, we have to be very careful of how we are analyzing the contemporary world, and i maintain there's a crisis already existing in those parts of the world that the united states has now drifted into and got involved in local conflict. >> host: so ambassador ahmed, do locals in afghanistan, different tribes, see the u.s. as attacking their personal tribe or see their own afghanistan government? >> guest: peter, you have now raised a very important question. you raised the third actor. so you have the united states, you have the tribes, and you now rates the idea of the central government as a third person
that this government will relentlessly follow every lead and give each an every guilty person or business responsible for any criminal or fraudulent act has been caught, exposed, prosecuted, and then expelled from ever again having any part in the uk food industry? >> i fully support what the honorable gentleman has said, but first of all let me join him in praising the constable. she died going about her job, keeping people safe in that unity, as those wishing the two other injured officers a full and quick recovery. i would join him in sydney my deepest condolences and those of a bullea point in this house tor colleagues and her loved ones. on the issue of this appalling situation where people buying these products in supermarkets are finding out that it could be horsemeat, let me say this. and bring the house up-to-date if i can come on the 15th of january it was that the irish authority identified problems in the number of beef products. on the 16th of january i said to the house that i would ask them to conduct an urgent investigation. as part of that investigation has been more testing and trac
that put big, big bets. we're lucky we have mit and caltech, but we are not at the country, the government side or the corporate side, putting those investments together and that's what i worry about. we're not investing more into it, when not going to be the ones that read the benefits. >> i think that's the question. is their net, whatever its taking place, in basic technology to support the stuff that you want to do. >> it's the case were lots of research as an economist would put a social -- the private return is insufficient to generate the private sector. and so that's why i think we have to look for more of these types of partnerships between government, industry. so one good example of this is collaboration that the federal government has with the semiconductor industry, where, so simply no amount institutions like bell labs, which created large investments in developing the first transistor, government and industry are now cosponsoring a series of university-based centers of excellence at mit and stanford and berkeley and ucla that our first alternative figure how do we take, as f
and government-run health care does not work. repeated over and over again. republican arguments along these lines seem incomprehensible to democrats, just as ours seemed misguided to them. the evidence that medical tests made no difference to them. free-market principles that they took as given conflicted with the information that we took every day from our constituents, and the economists that we consulted. news media preoccupation with lack of stability makes -- missed the point. i traveled of republican members of congress to the middle east and enjoy their company. we worked out together in the house gym. still, more time socializing with each other would not have closed the chasm between our competing views of the world and the role of government. it is those world views and the lack of comprehension on both sides that cripple the capacity of congress to make a bipartisan , strategic, public policy decisions. this i came to see is our greatest institutional weakness, and it defies simplistic yours. congress today is deeply divided because, to each side the opinions of the other m
. the national economy is stagnant, and the federal government on which our state has become so dependent over the years is faltering. weighed down by $16 trillion in debt. while new mexico has seen some job gapes in certain private -- job gains in certain private sector industries, there is no question that the number of government jobs is on the decline. last year new mexico lost more than 4,800 government jobs. 400 federal jobs in a single month. on top of that, many private sector companies that contract with the federal government have seen those contracts cut costing us more jobs. unfortunately, it doesn't look like washington, d.c. is going to solve the budget problem anytime soon. it's the fault of both parties, and can it's hurting -- and it's hurting new mexicans. i am committed to working with our delegation to protect our labs and military bases fighting to avoid further cuts. our labs and our bases are not only important to new mexico, but they're critical to the security of america. however, with a federal government that is so far in debt, so dysfunctional we'd be foolish to lea
of the ethics in government act. it applies only to all nominees for senate confirmed positions, but also to all candidates in federal elected office. my comment about your request for foreign funding are also part of the record. they will be on, way beyond what ever any but has requested that i think it's not feasible in many of the request that you may, to answer them. but the question that he did ask in part d of the form we ask all nominees to fill out is the following. during the past 10 years have you or your spouse received any compensation from or involving any financial or business transaction with a foreign government or an entity controlled by foreign government? the answer is no. you have every right to make a request beyond these requests that are required by all rules, but i do think that we ought to deny a vote to a nominee because he wants, or he is decided not tnotto respond to a request whih not only goes beyond our rule but in some cases go way beyond our rules. finally, if you wish to modify the form that we ask nominees to fill out, that's well and good. we're not going to d
effect next month lemine reduce spending by households in the government. we protect inflation-adjusted gdp will increase by about 1.5% in 2013 but it would increase roughly 1.5 percentage points faster were it not for the fiscal tightening. under current law then, we expect the unemployment rate will stay above 7.5% through next year. that would make 2014 the sixth consecutive year with unemployment so high, the longest such period since the 1930s. we expect the growth of the gdp will pick up after this year to about 3.5% per year in and 2014 in the following few years. the gap between the nations gdp and what it is capable of producing on a sustained basis that economist referred to as potential gdp will still not close quickly. undercurrent while we expect output to remain below its potential level until 2017, nearly a decade after the recession started in december december 2007. the nation has paid and will continue to pay a big price for the recession. we estimate the total loss in output relative to the economy's potential between 2007 and 2017 will be nearly equivalent t
for themselves, will we'll be welcomed as libattors, climb change is improving and government-run health care doesn't work, were repeated over and over again republican arguments seem as incomprehensible to democrats were as much misguided to them. the free market principles they took as given conflicted with the information we took every day from our constituents and the economists we consulted. news speed media preoccupation with lack of civility missed the point. i traveled withcongressional members to afghan and enjoyed they're company. we worked out together in the house gym. still more socializing with each other would not have breached khasm. congress is crippled from making bipartisan, strategic, public policy decisions. this is our greatest institutional weakness and defies simplistic cures. congress today is deeply divided because to each side, the opinions of the other make no sense. and, therefore, cannot be honestly held. interest group politics is still with us. fueled by unprecedented amounts of money, but its overlaid and often dominated by what i can only call world view poli
.s. and what the u.s. government's role has been in insuring that they come into this country, all right? and this evening we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. its fellow sanho tree and colette that youngers. and without further ado, i want to hand it over to the panel. [applause] >> thank you. thank you so much foring out here. -- for coming out here. i'm really excited. i just came in from new york. it's great to be here. i'm going to start off by talking about my book, and then we're going to go into a little bit about which focus is on coca and coca policy and then we'll get into how that's relevant especially this week and what's going on at the u.n. and the history of the tree that, basically, prohibits coca around the world. my book actually started out as a children's book. um, it started out as a follow-up to a children's book i did about marijuana back in 2004-2005. it wasn't a book about teaching kids how to smoke wield, but it was rather an educational book about a parent, how they might talk to their kids about a difficult subject that, you know, t
in and impose the strategy he wants to with the full agreement of the u.s. government. this has all been very exquisitely coordinated. >> now jonathancast, katz, who lived in haiti, talks about the work to rebuild the country. it's 45 minutes. >> hello. thank you for the introduction. this is very cool. this is my first book, so if i look like i'm really not accustomed to this, it's because i'm really not accustomed to this. so the book is called "the big truck that went by." and there's a spoiler in the subtitle. how the world came to save haiti and left behind a disaster, i'm going to read to you a little bit about it and talk about it, and then i hope that we have a good discussion as this topic usually provokes. so i'm going to start by reading from chapter one, the end. before i do i'm going to give myself some water. this brand of water is in the book. had i known that i would have picked that section. i can try to look for it in a little bit. these are actually delivered to haiti after the earthquake by the u.s. military. it's called fiji water for a reason. it comes from fiji, which i
you know, that is 60% of what they want to take additionally out of the government. so why would we do that? where is the leadership that says we're going to get this stopped we have a special subcommittee that looks at this, oversight it, look at the bad actors in government ever going to demand people who make this decisions get fired and those not performing pay the money back. you can defraud the federal government. you cannot perform on a contract and you can do it with impunity and that is because members of congress are basically not willing for inexperienced to not know that you ought to be able to hold people accountable for what they say they are going to do. whether it's a federal employee, a procurement employee for the company that is providing. .. her tenure in the bush administration where she served as national security adviser from 2001 to 2005 and as the 66th secretary of state from 2005 to 2009. this is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> it's one thing led to learn about american history in the classroom. it's quite another to of for these lessons up close and person
from what people paid regardless of what the government is taken out, or what they have paid in counts. it is count in the deficit numbers picture trying to do something about? who wants to go first? congressman price. >> yeah, the debt ceiling affairs. nobody is talking about paying the data. nobody is talking about not paying the public debt. what were talking about is making sure we get are spending under control so we can create an economy that's vibrant and be able to cover the debt of this great country without the austerity measures we've seen in other countries. so there's two things you got to think about. the debt that's been incurred. yes, the nation is good for that type. and the path forward. are we going to ban that down so they can actually have an economy that is vibrant and create jobs, or are we going to go as far as the eye can see? you could do some point we physically cannot create the wealth in the country to cover the data. so is it appropriate role? i'm a physician. i'm not a constitutional lawyer. my reading of it says all spending starts with the house of repr
include an official from the government accountability office which listed several areas under dhs control in his most recent high-risk list. the report highlights government programs and agencies that may be vulnerable to fraud, waste, abuse and mismanagement or are most in need of brought before. this hearing should get underway in just a moment. live coverage here on c-span2. [inaudible conversations] >> the committee on homeland security subcommittee on oversight and management officials will come to order. the purpose of this hearing is to examine the efficiency of the department of homeland security and how wisely their spending taxpayer dollars. let me begin by extending a warm welcome to other members of the subcommittee. i'm looking forward to working with the ranking member ron barber as we both share a strong commitment to u.s. border security and ensuring our border agents receive the support that they need to protect the homeland. last september, ron and i attended the dedication ceremony of the bryant a kerry border patrol station in arizona on wrangled patrol agent brian ter
and special investty -- investigative to study all laws and government activities are involving nonmilitary research and development remaining the same. i'd like to extend a warm welcome to the witnesses today, really appreciate you guys being here. also, i want to welcome our returning members and our new members including the subcommittees' ranking member and distinguished gentleman from new york new york. i look forward to working with you all and the ranking member on this committee. today's hearing focusing on intergrating unmanned aircraft systems or uas, into the national air space. as a pilot, i'm extremely interested in this issue. specifically, we hope to gain a better understanding of the risk, the technology obstacles, and key research and development efforts being undertaken to overcome the obstacles. uas has garnered a great deal of attention lately. in fact, if you watched the news this morning, there's a lot of -- lot of news about this issue. in january, pbs's "nov a" had a documentary called "rise of the drones," and last week's "time" magazine cover carried the same title
's expanding. as the mba working with the government to allow for release of additional american films and especially non-censored american films? >> sure. for many years laments are not just us, it is global. only 20 foreign films including around could be screened in the chinese market them as a result of a chip eto, world trade organization case negotiation of a trade office did a terrific job, were able to increase to 20 to 34. obviously china decides that it's going to allow the viewing public to see and said they do control that and that's great surprise. they have their own standards of what they assert that to allow to be show in their theaters. i mention in my remarks that what has happened is despite the size of the country, very few theaters in china. recently the chinese decided this is something they want to provide for their consumers and build in opening up 10 new screened today in the country to the point where they have 11,000 a few sicko was a handful. so we're working on it all the time, going back and forth then again there some issues that come up, but we think it
housing with governments to make decision, with writing and books and internet. where most people live past age 60, when we regulate and counter strangers just as i am encountering you this evening, and where most of our food is grown by older people, we forget that every one of those things a rosary recently in history. humans have constituted a separate line of biological evolution, about 6 million years. but all of the things i just mentioned didn't exist anywhere in the world 11,000 years ago. they rose only within the last 11,000 years, and some of them such as the internet and the phenomenon most people living past age 60 a rose only within the last century. that is the answer for all of us here, we are living under traditional tribal conditions until virtual yesterday, measured on a 6 million year time scale of human evolution. until europeans thought we spend around the world 500 years ago, tribal societies still occupied large part of all of the continent. but tribal societies have recently been coming under the control of modest societal state government. to the point where t
library and roberta -- james hudson, library officials, government officials, colleagues, new friends, old friends, i am simply thrilled and honored to see each of the year tonight. thank you for coming to this library from across the street and from all over the country. it is a joy that to think because of your connection to tom into each other that you are here. finding many of you and your addresses it became a heartwarming experience to learn just how connected you are to each other. and indeed how connected we all are through family, the white house, astra, george mason, the prudential mutual fund board, the hudson institute, the fight for internet freedom and tom's favorite great american pastimes dr. billington thank you for leaving the library with all -- what we we all recognize as the distinction and tear the 21st century and to your great judgment in bringing roberta i shaffer here. during the months of her chairman she has been a wise and important support. i have learned that she is the library and and the executive charge by dr. billington and in fact congressional and natio
to call for higher taxes to pay for more and more government spending. i don't believe the president acknowledges or at least he didn't last evening, the seriousness of our debt and fiscal crisis. we are nearly $16.5 trillion in debt, and $6 trillion of that debt is from the president's spending over the last four years. and he now has four more years to go. yet rather than tell the american people specifically how he will reduce this unsteanlt debt he pulled out the same tired playbook and made it clear his basic fiscal plan is ever-higher taxes. an almost obsession with telling the american people you're not taxed enough. when we are taxed to death practically and when you add up not just the federal but the state and the local and the sales and the excise and the gasoline and the entertainment and all the other taxes that american people pay in their daily lives that cuts into their paycheck in a very significant way each week, the real question is, is the solution to our problem more taxes on the american people? mr. president, you got your taxes. in the fiscal cliff debate you h
and defend offer security to our people. it's something that is not acceptable. this is what the government is supposed to be doing. the department of defense has absorbed almost $600 million of defense. with the sequestration and the cr problems there we are looking up to over this period of ten years a trillion dollars cut in a can't and it can't take place. mr. chairman, this hearing is critical to allow the joint chiefs to provide their frank and honest assessment about the impact to the services. the loss of capabilities or readiness in the mismatch between the resources and strategy we're going have to work together to ensure that they american people understand how serious this is. that's a reason for the hearing today. last week lead by senator ayotte, senators mccain, graham, and i introduced a bill to mitigate the impact of sequestration through the end of the fiscal year and provide the department with the for examplability to desperately needs to operate under a continuing resolution. it's not a perfect solution. it is better than doing nothing. there is a growing concern that
has been provided without any government subsidy. privatization would lead to a loss of service. there's enough mail volume to continue to provide universal service. we need to consider postage rates of service can tinea. postal rates are low compared to other industrialized countries. this includes for postal services have been privatized. i read slower. we appreciate the leadership of chairman carper and the problem caused a predefined name benefits. did $46 billion for health benefits, something more than enough. senate bill 1789 but is made another important change to offer additional products and services. the federal agencies and local governments make services more accessible. it's a number of ways for the postal service to provide useful services to the public while increasing revenues. these include secure digital mailboxes. they provide banking services for people in need of an expensive and readily available banking services. these changes are necessary. we need to preserve post office is for communities they serve. but these changes, the service can provide services in that
government and the previous one. the latest figures show people -- at 600 pounds per pupil per year less than english average. the worst in the entire country. does the prime minister agree that this is simply unfair? will you support our school campaign and pledged to end this discrepancy in this parliament? >> prime minister spent i will look carefully at what my honorable friend said. what -- we have protected the schools budget so that the per pupil funding is the same throughout this parliament. so head teachers can plan on the basis, and by encouraging academy schools and preschools we are making sure that schools get more of the education money going directly to them. >> thank you, mr. speaker. the isf describes the chance was benefits cut is giving with one hand and taking away with many others. does the prime minister think that the sister on hard-working families were at the same time he is giving to millionaires with both hands? >> i don't agree with the honorable lady but that's what the isf saves it as i quoted the lastly, the isf point out that actually the highest increase in t
things but in part on negotiations with the government of afghanistan over legal protections for our troops. the president has made clear that then missions of residual u.s. presence in afghanistan after 2014 will be limited to current terrorism operations and training and advising afghan forces. general austin would bring exceptional experience in overseeing this transition, having commanded u.s. forces in iraq during the reduction of u.s. forces and equipment from iraq. just this past weekend our forces in afghanistan have had a change of command, with general joseph duckworth replacing general john allen as commander of the international securities systems forces and commander of u.s. forces afghanistan. i want to take this opportunity to thank general allen for his thoughtful and devoted leadership in afghanistan, for his forthrightness and his interactions with me and the rest of the members of this committee. when senator reid and i visited afghanistan in january, we saw a real signs of progress, including the afghan security forces increasingly taking the lead responsibility f
to operate, most county governments, right now we have $80 trillion of things we have no idea where we get the money over 75 years. 88 trillion. its one point* 05 trillion of bills coming due the end we have over 75 years. view did not grow the government or the economy at all, a white reporter self in that position? so the federal reserve has increased the balance sheet trading to a trillion dollars of funny money and ultimately the pain of that will fall on the middle-class and the very pork but it will defeat of both parties said they want yet we don't have the courage to day to make the tough tauruses even if we lose our seat to secure the future we put ourselves first visit of the country and the american citizen if they read the black-and-white there common-sense ways to save money. just this week the air force announced we will spend 64 to million dollars of 90 projects. the gao says the least half of that will be wasted. it will never get completed or do what it is supposed to do. back-to-back we had a program cancelled as. because it will never work. this is out inefficient govern
in non-defense discretionary programs. and dd programs are core government functions provided for the benefit of all including public health and safety, law enforcement, education and job training, veterans services, medical and scientific research, weather monitoring and environmental protection, natural resources, housing and social services and transportation and infrastructure. ndd is pleased and honored to join with the aerospacaerospac e industries association and its unprecedented effort to stop sequestration and find a balanced approach to deficit reduction that does not include further cuts to discretionary programs. both defense and non-defense programs are equally critical to economic growth and the safety and security of our nation. these discretionary programs are not the reason for our growing debt and yet so far they have been the only place lawmakers have been willing to cut by $1.5 trillion today. non-defense programs alone have been cut a $900 billion bringing spending on these programs to levels not seen since eisenhower was president. as we saw from the whi
is when one side or the other -- which it has a perfect right to do under our system of government -- decides to try to kill a nomination by denying 60 votes or to stop legislation by 60 votes. the democrats have done it on a regular basis when they were in the minority, and the distinguished majority leader was one of the most effective persons in -- in the senate at doing that. i presided many times over the senate when he objected. i remember the -- you know, when we were trying to get 60 votes to -- to have a permanent change in the estate law and we'd get up to 57 or 58 or 59 and the distinguished majority leader would object. now, what are we doing today? we're doing today exactly what was said when the vote was called. the question was, do 60 of us believe that it's time to end debate on the nomination of the president to be secretary of defense, the leader of the largest military organization in the world, the largest employer in the united states, and the senate armed services committee has reported that recommendation to the senate two days ago? not ten days ago, not 15 d
they can do is broadcast. and they have a lot of rules that govern how they use the licenses. well, so what if broadcasting, um, over the air is not the wave of the future and instead it's, you know, some sort of mobile, um, you know, mobile service, you know, along the lines of what we do or some other, you know, companies might do? what this does is it actually say toss the licensee, well, if you put your spectrum up for sale, you'll get, you know, some portion of the proceeds. and if buyer comes in and they spend more than what the seller wants, then the commission has figured out that, well, the market has said that it's more valuable for another use. so that's one way. we're also working very closely with the federal government, um, on how to actually move certain federal government uses off of spectrum that's very valuable for mobile uses. there are also a number of, um, you know, efficiency gains that you can get through technology. for example, we launched our 4g network about two years ago, and it is much more efficient. so it allows us to get more use out of the spectrum. so each
to build an infrastructure, help the government provide basic services, build trust within a community, help build a secure structure. so these were things did not happen by coincidence. it was all part of this blog. and by the way, when i use the word plot, i generally am not a conspiracy guy. but these people refer to themselves as a plot. they called themselves the cabal, or the west point monkey because a lot of them came out of the social science department of west point, which had a tradition of forming networks among their own graduates. so this was very cautious here and for example, all of this happened not by coincidence. for example, petraeus when he was in leavenworth wasn't just sitting in leavenworth. he had a vast network of old colleagues throughout the pentagon bureaucracy. is reaching out to them. he deliberately forms a back channel. he cultivates this woman in the white house named meghan o'sullivan who was president bush's chief adviser on iraq in the national security council. he sees she's waving from the policy, he cultivates her. they're talking on the phone pr
of the national government and second, it meant logically the series of policies the federal government could undertake in order to make freedom national thereby putting slavery on the course of the ultimate extinction. stomach and was important for you. why did you decide you're going to use it as your title with is the moment this was granted convey what he most wanted to know about? >> it was the discovery we tend to write about the emancipation as something that starts entirely with the war and was the discovery that they can enter the war iraq with a set of policies they intended to pursue to make the freedom national based on this very controversial doctrine of what they believe the constitution did and didn't allow so my book is mostly about the origins and evolution of antislavery policy during the war and i discovered there are more into velo origen's than i had anticipated in the freedom national captures the organizing framework. >> see you think this is the conventional wisdom about the emancipation story? to overturn something? or do people have a different view about it? >> peop
any new firearms regulation at all, we will be inviting the government step-by-step to come ever closer to disarm the people. leaving only the police and military with firearms. with heller and mcdonald on the books, supreme court in its own words took certain policy choices off the table. thereby cleared the path a reasonable regulations to be enacted without fear that those policy choices would either open the door to unlimited government control, or be imperiled by exaggerated interpretation of the second amendment. as justice alito put in mcdonald, there's no longer any basis for such doomsday proclamations. justice scalia speaking for the court and heller said at the end of his opinion. under our interpretation, the constitution leaves open a variety of regulatory tools for combating the problem of gun violence in this country. the court was explicit in saying what some of those tools include. they include come anytime am quoting from the core, conditions and qualifications on the transfer of firearms to keep them out of dangerous hands, including felons and the mentally ill
talk about the role of government sometimes and how it works against business? do ceos have a role in talking about and defending capitalism and explaining it to people or is it something you purely do by example? >> guest: i think that we do. i mean, one of the most disturb statistics for me is that for the longest period of time -- you have to understand the history of the united states we started out really poor. we were backwater in the united states. and really as we embrace capitalism in the united states, our -- we had tens of millions of immigrants come over here to create a better life because they had more freedom. they had the freedom to enterprise. the freedom to start businesses. and for the longest period of time, well over 100 years, the united states was the freest nation in the world in terms of economic freedom knowles capitalistic nation in the world, without exception. and a short period a time ago just the year 2000, for example, the united states still ranked number three on the economic freedom index, and behind hong kong and singapore, so we weren't number o
in the government and the state department, defense department and the cia have security clearances for that entire length of time and i was convinced the kind of country in spirit that you need as an intelligence officer should be taken to this field of the defense budget and the military. i was told social security is the third rail of american politics and i guess it is but another rail of american politics and policy is the defense budget and if you look at what you read in the so-called mainstream press including the best of it, "the new york times," 85 to 90% of what we read in the paper and what we read in our magazines comes from officials sources we are getting what people want us to read. it's very difficult for a contrary and to get into the mainstream press and i know that from personal experience. in some ways the easiest thing to do is if you have something to say is try to draft a manuscript and see what happens. a starting point for me has to the eisenhower and everyone is familiar with a farewell address from 1961, the warning about the military-industrial complex. i was a student
government would've come back and george washington, the founders, would have been crucified quite literally. the fact that this did not happen is because of what happened institutions that iran did not have to worry about, at least not after the rise of the empire. and that was the house of commons, parliament. because in 1782, a year after, in the year after the battle of yorktown there was a very close vote in the house of commons to discontinue offense of operations in north america. the vote was 234-215. it was a nail biter but because lord north who was the hardline prime minister who want to prosecute the war against the american rebels, he lost the vote and, therefore, he had to resign office. and lord rockingham and his wigs were committed to a policy of conciliation with their american brothers took office. and that i would submit to you was truly where the american revolution was one. that was something founding fathers were very well aware of. they tried very hard to influence public opinion, not only in the american colonies but also in great britain. when you think about docume
, you know, we've got, we've got socialistic governments all over the world. if that's what you want, please, get on a plane and go there and live. >> host: so, june -- >> caller: we have got to get our country under control. >> host: so, june, do you think republicans should hold that line and let sequestration happen if they, if democrats will not agree to spending cuts? >> caller: well, they're not going to agree to spending cuts. they have all of the press, and it is spun every day. we hear nothing on the media about the fact that we are taxed too much. >> host: okay. >> caller: so they've got no reason to give in. they've got a president who wants to turn us into a third world country with all this taxing and redistribution of wealth. we've run out of wealth, by the way, it's just redistribution the crumbs on the table. and it's just too much. >> host: all right, june. let's listen to what nancy pelosi had to say. she was on the sunday talk shows yesterday, and here's what she had to say on this issue of a spending problem in washington. >> so it is almost a false argument to sa
governments, even when the current level of the federal funds rate cannot be lowered. the fomc's substantially expanded its forward guidance in recent years. in 2009, the committee stated that the economic conditions are likely to warrant conceptually low levels of the federal funds rate for an extended period. and 2011, the fomc said this period would likely last at least through mid-2013, and then extended the state guidance several times. a disadvantage of this calendar-based approach was that it might not be clear whether changes in the date reflect changes in the fomc is outlook for growth, for inflation, or a shift in the desired stance of policy. so last december the fomc replaced the date with greater detail on its economic conditions that would warrant maintaining the federal funds rate at its present exceptionally low levels. specifically, it stated that near zero rates would like to remain appropriate for a considerable time after the asset purchase program ends, and at least as long as the unemployment rate remains above 6.5%. inflation between one and two years ahead as projected,
and defending capitalism a as can you talk about a role of government sometimes and how it works against the business? thus ceos have a role in talking about and defending capitalism and explaining it to people or is it something that you purely due by example? >> i think we do to be one of the most disturbing statistics for me is you have to understand in the history of the united states we started out really poor. we were blackwater in the united states and as we embrace capitalism in the united states, which add tens of millions of immigrants come over here to create a better life for themselves because they had more freedom, more freedom to enterprise, they had the freedom to start businesses to bid for the longest period of time well over 100 years the united states was the freest nation in the world and economic freedom was the most capitalistic in the world without exception. in the shorter period of time ago it's the year 2000 for example the united states ranked number three on the economic freedom index behind hong kong and singapore. we were not number one but we were still nu
capitalism is. you talk about the role of government sometimes and how it works against business. d.c. has everyone talking about in defending capitalism the next painting it to people? or is it something you purely do by example? >> one of the most disturbing statistics for me is that for the longest period of time, you have to understand history of the united states started out really poor. we were a backwater for united states. really if they embraced capitalism in the united states, where tens of millions of immigrants come to create a better life because they had more freedom. they have the freedom to enterprise, to start businesses and for the longest period of time, the united states is the freest nation in the world in terms of economic freedom. a shorter period of time ago was the year 2000, for example, the united states still ranked number three in economic freedom index behind hong kong and singapore. so we went number one anymore, the worst of number three against pretty dynamic economies. over the last 13 years has now dropped to number 18. when people ask what's wrong with t
the troops wound up overthrowing the government. but to my mind, a great template as how to do this successfully comes from somebody that we tend to forget these days but we should remember the quiet american who was once a legendary figure he was a former advertising man who joined the air force and the cia and was sent to the philippines and 1940's when they were facing the rebellion, one of the major communist uprising of the post world period and what he did was he didn't send an army to back them up she simply drove out into the boondocks to get to know the people of the philippines he didn't send the embassy like so many officials today he went out to figure out what was going on into the most important thing he did is identified a great leader that could lead the philippines out of this with some support and that was from a filipino center when they encountered him. he pushed to make first the defense minister and then the president and he was a great leader that rooted out a lot of the corruption which was causing people to turn away from the government. he ended the br
which will depend on many things but in part on negotiations with the government of afghanistan over a legal protection for the troops. the president has made clear that the missions of any residual u.s. military presence in afghanistan after 2014 will be limited to counterterrorism operations and tracing to the training and advising forces. general austin would bring exceptional experience overseeing this transition having commanded u.s. forces in iraq during the reduction of u.s. forces and equipment from iraq. just this past weekend, the forces in afghanistan have had a change of command with, excuse me, joseph replacing general john allen as the commander of the international security assistant forces and commander u.s. forces afghanistan. i want to take this opportunity to see three general ellen for your thoughtful and devoted leadership and afghanistan for his forthrightness and interactions and the rest of the members of the committee. when senator reid and i visited afghanistan and january we saw the signs of progress including the afghan security forces increasingly taking
that too much government is bad. the government intervention is the problem. >> guest: hmm. interesting. >> host: but it's reasonable to interpret your book that way. right? one could say, conservatives, maybe even libertarian, wait a minute, this is what happens when government keeps tinkering and engineering, they trytake make us equal and as a result we end up hurting the very people we are were trying to help. this is what happens when government gets in the way. >> guest: yeah. it's not necessarily what i was trying get across. [laughter] >> host: but it's not -- >> guest: i think that the issue with that is who is running government? and who is -- for whose benefit? that's what ended up having with desegregation. the problem is the decisions were being made for the most part with a certain constituent tune si in mind and keeping dd constituency in explained keeping them happen and wasn't just they white middle class. we're trying to keep the black civil rights liberal who fought for desegregation happy, too, and there was that contingent in louisville fight for desegregation very
, the federal government spent $223 billion in interest payments alone. that means we're spending more on interest on the national debt each month than we spend in an entire year on naval shipbuilding and the coast guard budget. just think about that. the interest payment in one month exceeds the entire coast guard budget and the entire budget for shipbuilding in the navy. and the estimates are by the middle of this decade, not some distant year, our interest payments to china, our largest foreign creditor, at $1.2 trillion will be covering the entire cost of that communist country's military. think of the horrific irony of that. at the same time that america is bound by treaties to defend our allies in asia against chinese aggression, the american taxpayers are bankrolling the threat through the interest payments that we are paying to the chinese. now, mr. president, neither the senator from new hampshire or i are saying that the pentagon should be exempt from budget scrutiny or even future cuts, but the disproportionate impact that sequestration would have on our troops, on our natio
of citizenship, we're not teaching citizens, if we believe citizens are responsible for their own government, we par riel our own republic. we're in the low end of the funding scale because most of the budgetary priority goes to the other subjects. our textbooks are not very good to begin with. please do something because as much as we love the story telling in your american trilogy, we can't assign it to our kids, and most of our kids are getting their materials now on ipads. that sort of thing anyhow, and if there were material put in a form that we could use, we could bypass the whole textbook business, and we could engage our students, and we could have a great leap forward. i met a lot of these teachers, and it really occurred to me they were telling me the same thing for years. story telling is critical in race, but it has to be done in a way that's paletteble to the students, and we can't blame the students for not learning history. if we don't teach it to them, we can't blame them for not learning it. if i believe as i do, and i'll explain very briefly why i believe a sense of american h
concerned that one day the high amount of government debt in japan would catch up to it. over 90% of it is held by japanese. and now, of course, 235% of gdp, the largest of any developed country in the world. and this is something that has to be taken into account as these stimulus programs are pushed ahead, because it's something that japan has got to deal with sooner rather than later. it's sort of like us with our spending problem here. so i think what are we hooking at -- looking at worldwide? i've mentioned the three largest economies in the world. i have not mentioned china because i've been talking about developed economies. but i think we're looking to the emerging markets 2013 to be very much a driver. and we have a new leadership in china, jinping, li will come in as premier. they will take these posts formally in march, and i'm optimistic based on my knowledge of these two individuals -- particularly xi jinping, and i think what you're going to see there is they're going to open up the economy and the financial sector. i think they'll be freeing interest rates, they'll
cruxes their government going into this research? >> there is money going to the research from the government's -- the united states has the national institute of aging that funds research on alzheimer's and more speculative research programs like the ones we are talking about now then there's also rich and middle of the road who give to her private foundation. he started something awhile back and now he runs the foundation with a slightly different name. he's not getting rich from the foundations than they are not sponsoring a huge amount of research, but this work is going on. unfortunately the national institute of aging is a poor stepsister in the national institute. there is much more for instance park for the research on cancer than of there is in both. islamic that is another thing that emerged as i study the question that i've begun to find problematic. the single biggest risk factor for kansas is age. the older we get the more physically prepared we are. what is changing in our bodies that is predisposing us to a disease like cancer or alzheimer's which are very well f
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